Department of Art Events

Visiting Artist Lectures
Undergraduate Exhibitions
MFA Thesis Exhibitions
Critical Conversations


To limit the spread of COVID-19, most events are being held remotely. If you have questions about a specific event, please contact the event organizer or see the event description in the UO Calendar.

Apr 18
Lost/Found: Work by Advanced Printmaking Students10:00 a.m.

This exhibition manifests the Printmaking area in the College of Design, exhibiting works by undergraduate students Lily Cronn, Benjamin Gregg, Laneate Vang, and graduate student...
March 28–May 22
Erb Memorial Union (EMU), Adell McMillan Gallery

This exhibition manifests the Printmaking area in the College of Design, exhibiting works by undergraduate students Lily Cronn, Benjamin Gregg, Laneate Vang, and graduate student Noelle Herceg. Some selected works in Letterpress are also included. Ranging from traditional techniques of relief, intaglio, screenprint, letterpress, to unique and unconventional works on paper and textiles, this exhibition encompasses the diversity of mark that printmaking can achieve.

 

*UO ID required to visit the gallery in person. Virtual artist talk / tour will be available via Visual Arts Team Instagram (@uovisualarts) and Facebook (@visualartsteam).*

Apr 18
Garrick Imatani: Monologuenoon

UO Center for Art Research Exhibition Garrick Imatani: Monologue April 3 to May 1, 2021 at Eugene Contemporary Art's gallery ANTI-AESTHETIC, 245 W. 8th...
April 3–May 1
, ANTI-AESTHETIC

UO Center for Art Research Exhibition

Garrick Imatani: Monologue
April 3 to May 1, 2021 at Eugene Contemporary Art's gallery ANTI-AESTHETIC, 245 W. 8th Ave in Eugene, Oregon
Gallery hours: Saturdays & Sundays from noon- 4:00 p.m. by appointment    

Garrick Imatani’s project Monologue examines the forces that inform and shape perceptions of non-dominant cultural identities. Through an examination of his own Japanese cultural heritage, Imatani creates objects and iconographies that use direct observation or online engagement to setup an alternative punchline. With his project he questions the aesthetics of assimilation and authenticity, as well as the contemporary and conceptual which continue to situate works within co-opted art historical references. The objects and prints comprising this installation question both the dominant canon and inclusionary and equity constructs – first enforced by colonialist aesthetics and further perpetuated within institutional frameworks and scholarship. In creating interactive objects layered with humorous imagery, Imatani seeks to diffuse the notion of an intangible “essence” of a culture—inviting instead a de-centralized, intricate and multifaceted reading of cultural properties beyond one’s own.

Garrick Imatani is an artist who uses performance, functional objects, or interaction to draw attention to one’s embodied subjectivity. Working in sculpture, photography, video and installation, recent projects focus on reimagining racialized historical erasures into more believable and inspired futures. Past works have included collaborating with illegally-surveilled activists to readjust city archives, re-enacting labor on the transcontinental railroad, and working with the Grand Ronde tribe to replicate their sacred meteorite held in the American Museum of Natural History.

His work has been exhibited at the Blaffer Art Museum (Houston), Triumph Gallery (Moscow), Art in General (NYC), Disjecta Contemporary Art Center (Portland, OR), Chachalu Museum (Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, OR), Art, Design and Architecture Museum at UC Santa Barbara, and Portland Museum of Art (ME), among others. He has received grant support from The Andy Warhol Foundation, Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, The Ford Family Foundation, Oregon Arts Commission, Maine Arts Commission, Regional Arts & Culture Council and Oregon Percent for Art. Imatani holds an MFA from Columbia University, NY and resides in Portland, OR where he is an Associate Professor and Chair of Foundation at Pacific Northwest College of Art.

This exhibition is organized as part of Dismantling the House, a series of public programs and exhibitions curated by Yaelle S. Amir, CFAR’s 2020-21 Curator-in-Residence. Programs are made possible by the Ford Family Foundation.

Apr 18
Making After Melancholia: A Discussion Between Garrick Imatani, Lynn Yarne and Lu Yimnoon

UO Center for Art Research Discourse Free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. In conjunction with Garrick Imatani’s...
April 18 noon

UO Center for Art Research Discourse

Free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here.

In conjunction with Garrick Imatani’s exhibition Monologue at Eugene Contemporary Art’s gallery space ANTI-AESTHETIC, the Center for Art Research at the University of Oregon will host a conversation between artists Imatani (Portland), Lynn Yarne (Portland) and Lu Yim (New York) reflecting on the cultural representation of their Asian American identity. The dialogue will address the artists’ perception of the nuanced ways in which their identity figures into their work—looking at compounded layers of representation, cultural expectation vs. lived experience, and the futurist contexts in which their work as Asian American makers might be seen.

Garrick Imatani is an artist who uses performance, functional objects, or interaction to draw attention to one’s embodied subjectivity. Working in sculpture, photography, video and installation, recent projects focus on reimagining racialized historical erasures into more believable and inspired futures. Past works have included collaborating with illegally-surveilled activists to readjust city archives, re-enacting labor on the transcontinental railroad, and working with the Grand Ronde tribe to replicate their sacred meteorite held in the American Museum of Natural History. His work has been exhibited at the Blaffer Art Museum (Houston), Triumph Gallery (Moscow), Art in General (NYC), Disjecta Contemporary Art Center (Portland, OR), Chachalu Museum (Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, OR), Art, Design and Architecture Museum at UC Santa Barbara, and Portland Museum of Art (ME), among others. He has received grant support from The Andy Warhol Foundation, Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, The Ford Family Foundation, Oregon Arts Commission, Maine Arts Commission, Regional Arts & Culture Council and Oregon Percent for Art. Imatani holds an MFA from Columbia University, NY and resides in Portland, OR where he is an Associate Professor and Chair of Foundation at Pacific Northwest College of Art.

Lynn Yarne is an artist and educator from Portland, Oregon. She works within animation and collage to address collective memory, generational narratives, histories and space. A fourth generation Chinese and Japanese American, her current work explores themes of displacement and loss, resilience and community, particularly within Old Town Portland. She is curious about participatory works, magic, and rejuvenation. 

Lu Yim is a movement based artist and teacher. Yim is a co-organizer of Physical Education (PE) and Pidzn Club, two artist-for-artist run groups based in Portland, OR. Currently they are an Artist-in-Residence at Center for Performance Research (Brooklyn, NY).

This dialogue is organized as part of Dismantling the House, a series of public programs and exhibitions curated by Yaelle S. Amir, CFAR’s 2020-21 Curator-in-Residence. Programs are made possible by the Ford Family Foundation.

Apr 19
"amalgamenagerie"9:00 a.m.

New work by Tyler Stoll, Erin Langley, and Noelle Herceg   *Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these...
April 19–22
Lawrence Hall, LaVerne Krause Gallery

New work by Tyler Stoll, Erin Langley, and Noelle Herceg

 

*Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these exhibitions.*

Apr 19
"How We Got Here: Sketches versus Finals in Comic Art"9:00 a.m.

New work by Rose Gibian. *Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these exhibitions.*
April 19–22
Lawrence Hall, Foyer Gallery

New work by Rose Gibian.

*Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these exhibitions.*

Apr 19
"Yellow Kid"9:00 a.m.

Lily Wai Brennan introduces a new character in her work that abstracts her self-identification with race. This show features works surrounding experiences with Asian American hate...
April 19–22
Ceramics Building, Washburn Gallery

Lily Wai Brennan introduces a new character in her work that abstracts her self-identification with race. This show features works surrounding experiences with Asian American hate crimes from a personal perspective.

 





*Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these exhibitions.*




Apr 22
Rebecca Morris Artist Talk 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research Rebecca Morris is an abstract painter whose work deeply investigates...
April 22 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

Rebecca Morris is an abstract painter whose work deeply investigates materials, form, processes, and outcomes. A showcase for her extensive arsenal of techniques and ideas, her ambitious large-scale canvases incorporate different manners of mark-making and inventively explore questions of frame dynamics and figure/ground illusions, often within a remarkably shallow pictorial space.

Rebecca Morris, b.1969 in Honolulu, Hawaii; lives in Los Angeles, California. BA, Smith College; MFA, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago; The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. She is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of California, Los Angeles. Solo exhibitions include: Bortolami, NYC (2020); Blaffer Art Museum, Houston TX (2019); Mary Boone Gallery, NYC (2017); 356 S. Mission Rd, Los Angeles (2015); The Bonnefantenmuseum, The Netherlands (2014); Kunsthalle Lingen, Germany (2013); Galerie Barbara Weiss, Berlin (2017, 2013, 2009, 2006); Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago (2016, 2013); Harris Lieberman, New York (2012, 2010); The Renaissance Society, Chicago (2005); and Santa Monica Museum of Art (2003); forthcoming, ICALA, Los Angeles (2022). Group exhibitions include: Made in LA at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2016); Whitney Biennial, NY (2014); Kunstmuseum St. Gallen, Switzerland; The Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles; Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH; Victoria Miro Gallery, London; Sammlung Goetz, Munich; David Zwirner Gallery, NYC; Galerie nchst St. Stephan, Vienna, Austria; The Hessel Art Museum at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Gavin Browns Enterprise, NYC; The Pit, CA. Morris was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, Tiffany Foundation; The California Community Foundation; The City of Los Angeles Individual Artist Award; The Durfee Foundation; Art Matters; and the Illinois Arts Council.

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom - register here. The lecture will also livestream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Apr 26
"Across the Threshold"9:00 a.m.

Across the Threshold: Comparing Aesthetic Experience in the Street and in the Gallery   Does being inside a gallery impact how we see art? Let's find out...
April 26–29
Ceramics Building, Washburn Gallery

Across the Threshold: Comparing Aesthetic Experience in the Street and in the Gallery

 

Does being inside a gallery impact how we see art? Let's find out together.

Enter, view a series of aesthetic objects, complete a brief (volunteer) survey, recieve results.

 

Honors College Thesis Exhibition by Noah Jordan

 





*Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these exhibitions.*




May 5
The Heart Milagro: A Cinco De Mayo Celebration of Latino Art with the University of Oregonnoon

Join Jessica Zapata founder of Arte Latino and the University of Oregon for a celebration of Latino Arts by participating in a facilitated art and history project. The project...
May 5 noon

Join Jessica Zapata founder of Arte Latino and the University of Oregon for a celebration of Latino Arts by participating in a facilitated art and history project. The project will celebrate the art and life of Frida Kahlo and each participant or family will have the opportunity to create The Heart Milagro which represents love, healing and gratitude, as well as longing. This workshop is offered over Zoom.

A link to materials for the project will be sent out after registering for the event.

If you need the materials mailed to you, please email engagement@uoregon.edu no later than April 25, 2021.

Learn more about Arte Latino: https://eugeneartelatino.wordpress.com/about/

May 6
Amir Zaki: “Building and Becoming”4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series  Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research The event is free and open to the public and live on...
May 6 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series 
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Amir Zaki has an ongoing interest in the rhetoric of authenticity, as it is associated with photography as an indexical media. Simultaneously, he is deeply invested in exploring digital technology’s transformative potential to disrupt that assumed authenticity. However, his interest is not in utilizing digital trickery as illustration to undermine a photograph’s veracity. In fact, Zaki often creates hybridized photographs that carefully use the vocabulary of the documentary style so that the viewer’s belief in its veracity remains intact, at least initially. He constructs scenes that are somewhat off-register, ‘out of key’, and ever so slightly faux. He often uses the architectural and organic landscape of California as a subject, as it seems particularly appropriate to his process. This is largely because, either through media myth, reality or a combination of the two, the architecture and surrounding landscape in California is itself an evolving bastardization of styles and forms, in other words a pastiche. California is home to a collision of high modernist ideals, suburban McMansions, high-rise density, endless asphalt grids, deserts, mountains, beaches, Los Angeles urbanism, Inland Empire sprawl, Orange Curtain conservatism, the Crystal Cathedral, and the Integratron. It should be made clear that although Zaki is fascinated and inspired by this architectural and cultural entropy, his intention is not to record, replicate or simply document a preexisting postmodern pastiche. More precisely, his work begins with the familiar, by looking at objects, structures and locations that are often pedestrian and banal. And by capitalizing on the presumed veracity that photographs continue to command, along with the transformative, yet invisible digital alterations he employs, his images depict structures that that aspire to be added to the list of the hodge-podge built landscape that creates the California mythology.

Amir Zaki is a practicing artist living in Southern California. He received his MFA from UCLA in 1999 and has been regularly exhibiting nationally and internationally since. Zaki has had over 30 solo exhibitions at institutions and galleries including the Mak Center Schindler House, the Doyle Arts Pavilion, the Dalian Modern Museum (China), ACME gallery, Perry Rubenstein Gallery, James Harris GalleryEdward Cella Art & Architecture, and Roberts Projects (formerly Roberts and Tilton). He has been included in over 50 group exhibitions in significant venues including The California Biennial: 2006 at the Orange County Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, Andreas Grimm Gallery in Munich, Germany, Harris Lieberman Gallery in New York, Flag Art Foundation in New York, Western Bridge in Seattle, Shane Campbell Gallery in Chicago, the California Museum of PhotographyMuseum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, the San Jose Museum of Art, and the Nevada Museum of Art. Zaki’s work is part of numerous public and private collections across the country including the Whitney Museum of American ArtNew Museum of Contemporary ArtLos Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)UCLA Hammer Museum, the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle, Washington, the Orange County museum of Art, and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Zaki has three monographs, VLHV (2003), Eleven Minus One (2010) and California Concrete: A Landscape of Skateparks (2019). He has been included in a Phaidon Press anthology of contemporary photography called Vitamin Ph and contributed essays to LACMA’s groundbreaking text, Words Without Pictures. He has been included in both an Aperture anthology organized by Charlotte Cotton called Photography is Magic, which addresses a major technological shift in contemporary photographic practices, as well as the anthology entitled Both Sides of Sunset: Photographing Los Angeles.

May 8
garima thakur & Sharita Towne: we’re out of control6:00 p.m.

Center for Art Research Exhibition garima thakur & Sharita Towne: we’re out of control May 8- 30, 2021   Well Well Projects, 8371 N Interstate...
May 8–30
Well Well Projects

Center for Art Research Exhibition
garima thakur & Sharita Towne: we’re out of control

May 8- 30, 2021  
Well Well Projects, 8371 N Interstate Ave #1, Portland, OR 97217

Opening reception: Saturday, May 8 from 6:00- 9:00 p.m.
Gallery hours: Saturday and Sunday from noon- 5:00 p.m. and by appointment

we’re out of control is an exhibition centered on the ongoing impact and manifestations of colonialism—weaving multiple histories and geographies into cross-cultural solidarity. The installation will utilize the architecture and location of the gallery space to prompt visitors to reflect on their contribution to and position within colonialist structures of global societies. By looking to parallel diasporic experiences across continents and eras, this collaboration points to the ways in which these narratives are constant, ingrained and interconnected.

garima thakur is an interdisciplinary artist born and raised in New Delhi. She works with histories, narratives and multitudinous realities of assimilation, alienation, and collectivism. She is currently stationed in Portland, OR, and works as an assistant professor of interaction media and graphic design at Western Oregon University.

Sharita Towne is a multidisciplinary artist and educator based in Portland, OR. Born and raised on the West Coast of the U.S. along Interstate 5 from Salem, OR, to Tacoma, WA and down to Sacramento, CA, Sharita is a true granddaughter of the great migration. She is most interested in engaging local and global Black geographies, histories, and possibilities. In her work, a shared art penetrates and binds people–artists, audience, organizers, civic structures, sisters, cousins, and landscape–in collective catharsis, grief, and joy. Sharita holds a BA from UC Berkeley, an MFA from Portland State University, and was recently appointed Program Head of the Pacific Northwest College of Art’s MFA in Visual Studies. Sharita’s work has received support from organizations like Creative Capital, the Fulbright Association, Art Matters, The Ford Family Foundation, Oregon Community Foundation, Oregon Arts Commission, The Miller Foundation, the Regional Arts and Culture Council, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Open Signal, SPACES in Cleveland, and the Independent Publishing Resource Center in Portland. She is a 2020 MRG Lilla Jewel Award recipient.

This exhibition and dialogue are organized as part of Dismantling the House, a series of public programs and exhibitions curated by Yaelle S. Amir, CFAR’s 2020-21 Curator-in-Residence. Programs are made possible by the Ford Family Foundation. Additional support for this exhibition was generously provided by the Caldera Arts Residency program, Oregon Arts Commission and The Ford Family Foundation, and produced in partnership with Well Well Projects.

May 20
Natalie Ball: “Power Objects”4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series  Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research The event is free and open to the public and live on...
May 20 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series 
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Natalie Ball was born and raised in Portland, Oregon. She has a Bachelor’s degree with a double major in Ethnic Studies and Art from the University of Oregon. She furthered her education in New Zealand at Massey University where she attained her Master’s degree, focusing on Indigenous contemporary art. Ball then relocated to her ancestral homelands to raise her three children. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, including the Half Gallery, NY; Vancouver Art Gallery, BC; Blum & Poe, LA; Portland Art Museum, OR; Gagosian, NY; Seattle Art Museum, WA; Almine Rech Gallery, FR; and SculptureCenter, NY. Natalie attained her M.F.A. degree in Painting & Printmaking at Yale School of Art in 2018. She is the recipient of the 2020 Bonnie Bronson Award, 2020 Joan Mitchell Painters & Sculptors Grant, 2019 Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, and the 2018 Betty Bowen Award from the Seattle Art Museum.

 

 

May 27
Mario Ybarra Jr.: “I Did It for Revenge!” George and Matilda Fowler Lecture5:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series  Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research The event is free and open to the public and live on...
May 27 5:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series 
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Mario Ybarra Jr. will discuss some of his past projects and discuss the important role of the individual and collaborative artist in relationship to creating and in finding ways to tell one's family's stories and other marginalized narratives that have guided his artistic practice. He will engage audiences in creative strategies/tools for thinking and making Art.

Mario Ybarra Jr., is a visual and performance artist, educator, and activist who combines street culture with fine art in order to produce what he calls “contemporary art that is filtered through a Mexican-American experience in Los Angeles.”  His work has been included in many group exhibitions, including Installations Inside/Out: Armory 20th Anniversary Exhibition, Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena, California; San Juan Poly/Graphic Triennial of the Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña, San Juan, Puerto Rico; Phantom Sightings: Art After the Chicano Movement, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, California; and Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York (2008). He is co-founder of an artist run organization located in the Harbor area of Los Angeles, called Slanguage Studio (2002-present). 

Made possible by the George and Matilda Fowler Endowment Fund.

 

 

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