Department of Art Events

Visiting Artist Lectures
Undergraduate Exhibitions
MFA Thesis Exhibitions
Critical Conversations


To limit the spread of COVID-19, most events are being held remotely. If you have questions about a specific event, please contact the event organizer or see the event description in the UO Calendar.

Mar 4
Hamza Walker and Mahfuz Sultan: Critical Conversations4:00 p.m.

Hamza Walker will be in conversation with Mahfuz Sultan. The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream...
March 4 4:00 p.m.

Hamza Walker will be in conversation with Mahfuz Sultan.

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Hamza Walker is the director of the Los Angeles nonprofit art space LAXART and an adjunct professor at the School of Art Institute of Chicago. Prior to joining LAXART in 2016, he was director of education and associate curator at the Renaissance Society, a non-collecting contemporary art museum in Chicago, for 22 years where he organized numerous shows and public programming and wrote extensively on the field of contemporary art.

Notable shows at the Renaissance Society include “Suicide Narcissus” (2013), “Black Is, Black Ain’t” (2008) and “New Video, New Europe” (2004). In addition to his work at the Renaissance Society, Walker also co-curated the Made in L.A. 2016 biennial. He has won the Walter Hopps Award for Curatorial Achievement in 2014 and the prestigious Ordway Prize in 2010 for his significant impact on the field of contemporary art.

Mahfuz Sultan is an architect, writer, and founder of CLOCKS, a research and design practice based in Los Angeles.

The Visiting Artist Lecture Series is presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research. This lecture is made possible by the Critical Conversations program, a partnership between the Ford Family Foundation and the University of Oregon Department of Art's Center for Art Research.

Mar 8
"Portraits"12:00 a.m.

"As an artist, I found myself only making art for clients or commissions. I could feel myself losing my personal connection to painting. "Portraits" is a personal...
March 8–10
Lawrence Hall, Foyer Gallery

"As an artist, I found myself only making art for clients or commissions. I could feel myself losing my personal connection to painting. "Portraits" is a personal collection of mine of women that
inspire me. Painting these women 'just for me' allowed me to learn more about who they are/were and embrace the qualities in myself that their portraits taught me."
 

Curated by Carli Torti featuring work by Carli Torti, Elizabeth Brophy, Sarah Mullins, & Brooke
Brady.

 

*Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these exhibitions.*

Mar 8
"Invite Your Mom"9:00 a.m.

Featuring artwork by the Art and Tech BFA Cohort. Athena Trames Brian Nelson Charlie Zach Finn Sylwester Henry Brown Kyle Nelson *Note: Due to COVID-19...
March 8–10
Lawrence Hall, LaVerne Krause Gallery


Featuring artwork by the Art and Tech BFA Cohort.



Athena Trames
Brian Nelson
Charlie Zach
Finn Sylwester
Henry Brown
Kyle Nelson


*Note: Due to COVID-19 restrictions, UO ID cards or building access codes are required to gain entry to these exhibitions.*

Apr 8
Glenn Adamson: “Craft in America: Real and Ideal”3:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research  Co-sponsored by the MFA Applied Craft + Design at PNCA The...
April 8 3:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research 
Co-sponsored by the MFA Applied Craft + Design at PNCA

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Drawing from his new book, Craft: An American History, Glenn Adamson will engage in conversation with Anya Kivarkis. They will discuss the implication of race, gender and class in US craft history, and focus particularly on the relationship between craft’s economic and material presence, and its rich symbolic dimension. There are important differences between real and ideal, yet each influences the other in a complex exchange.

Glenn Adamson is a curator, writer and historian based in New York. He has previously been Director of the Museum of Arts and Design; Head of Research at the V&A; and Curator at the Chipstone Foundation in Milwaukee. Adamson’s publications include Thinking Through Craft (2007); The Craft Reader (2010); Postmodernism: Style and Subversion (2011, co-edited with Jane Pavitt); The Invention of Craft (2013); Art in the Making (2016, co-authored with Julia Bryan-Wilson; and Fewer Better Things: The Hidden Wisdom of Objects (2018). His newest book is Craft: An American History, published by Bloomsbury, and he is co-host of the online interview series Design in Dialogue

Apr 15
Alison Saar and Hank Willis Thomas in conversation with Hamza Walker4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series Made possible by the Jordan Schnitzer Collection and Family Foundation and presented by the Department of Art, Center for Art...
April 15 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series

Made possible by the Jordan Schnitzer Collection and Family Foundation and presented by the Department of Art, Center for Art Research, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, and Ford Family Foundation Critical Conversations Program in conjunction with the exhibition of works by Hank Willis Thomas and Alison Saar from the Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer at the JSMA, on view through June 14, 2021.

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Alison Saar’s sculpture, prints and paintings address issues of race, gender and spirit.  She studied art and art history at Scripps College and received an MFA from the Otis Art Institute.  Her awards include a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, National Endowment Fellowships, and the United States Artists Fellowship. Alison has exhibited at many museums, including the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Whitney Museum of American Art, Her art is represented in the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art. She currently resides in Los Angeles and is represented by L A Louver Gallery.

Hank Willis Thomas is a conceptual artist working primarily with themes related to perspective identity, commodity, media, and popular culture. His work is included in numerous public collections including the Museum of Modern Art in New York; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Brooklyn Museum, New York; the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. His collaborative projects include Question Bridge: Black Males, In Search Of The Truth (The Truth Booth), and For Freedoms, the first artist-run initiative for art and civic engagement. In 2017, For Freedoms was awarded the ICP Infinity Award for New Media and Online Platform. Thomas is also a recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship (2018), the AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize (2017), the Soros Equality Fellowship (2017), and is a member of the New York City Public Design Commission.

Apr 22
Rebecca Morris: “Artist Talk” 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series  Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research The event is free and open to the public and live on...
April 22 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series 
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream on the Department of Art Facebook.

 

Rebecca Morris is an abstract painter whose work deeply investigates materials, form, processes, and outcomes. A showcase for her extensive arsenal of techniques and ideas, her ambitious large-scale canvases incorporate different manners of mark-making and inventively explore questions of frame dynamics and figure/ground illusions, often within a remarkably shallow pictorial space. 

 

Rebecca Morris, b.1969 in Honolulu, Hawaii; lives in Los Angeles, California. BA, Smith College; MFA, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago; The Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. She is a Professor in the Department of Art at the University of California, Los Angeles. Solo exhibitions include: Bortolami, NYC (2020); Blaffer Art Museum, Houston TX (2019); Mary Boone Gallery, NYC (2017); 356 S. Mission Rd, Los Angeles (2015); The Bonnefantenmuseum, The Netherlands (2014); Kunsthalle Lingen, Germany (2013); Galerie Barbara Weiss, Berlin (2017, 2013, 2009, 2006); Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago (2016, 2013); Harris Lieberman, New York (2012, 2010); The Renaissance Society, Chicago (2005); and Santa Monica Museum of Art (2003); forthcoming, ICALA, Los Angeles (2022). Group exhibitions include: “Made in LA” at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2016);  Whitney Biennial, NY (2014); Kunstmuseum St. Gallen, Switzerland; The Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles; Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, OH; Victoria Miro Gallery, London; Sammlung Goetz, Munich; David Zwirner Gallery, NYC; Galerie nächst St. Stephan, Vienna, Austria; The Hessel Art Museum at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, NYC; The Pit, CA. Morris was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, Tiffany Foundation; The California Community Foundation; The City of Los Angeles Individual Artist Award; The Durfee Foundation; Art Matters; and the Illinois Arts Council.

May 6
Amir Zaki: “Building & Becoming”4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series  Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research The event is free and open to the public and live on...
May 6 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series 
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Amir Zaki has an ongoing interest in the rhetoric of authenticity, as it is associated with photography as an indexical media. Simultaneously, he is deeply invested in exploring digital technology’s transformative potential to disrupt that assumed authenticity. However, his interest is not in utilizing digital trickery as illustration to undermine a photograph’s veracity. In fact, Zaki often creates hybridized photographs that carefully use the vocabulary of the documentary style so that the viewer’s belief in its veracity remains intact, at least initially. He constructs scenes that are somewhat off-register, ‘out of key’, and ever so slightly faux. He often uses the architectural and organic landscape of California as a subject, as it seems particularly appropriate to his process. This is largely because, either through media myth, reality or a combination of the two, the architecture and surrounding landscape in California is itself an evolving bastardization of styles and forms, in other words a pastiche. California is home to a collision of high modernist ideals, suburban McMansions, high-rise density, endless asphalt grids, deserts, mountains, beaches, Los Angeles urbanism, Inland Empire sprawl, Orange Curtain conservatism, the Crystal Cathedral, and the Integratron. It should be made clear that although Zaki is fascinated and inspired by this architectural and cultural entropy, his intention is not to record, replicate or simply document a preexisting postmodern pastiche. More precisely, his work begins with the familiar, by looking at objects, structures and locations that are often pedestrian and banal. And by capitalizing on the presumed veracity that photographs continue to command, along with the transformative, yet invisible digital alterations he employs, his images depict structures that that aspire to be added to the list of the hodge-podge built landscape that creates the California mythology.

Amir Zaki is a practicing artist living in Southern California. He received his MFA from UCLA in 1999 and has been regularly exhibiting nationally and internationally since. Zaki has had over 30 solo exhibitions at institutions and galleries including the Mak Center Schindler House, the Doyle Arts Pavilion, the Dalian Modern Museum (China), ACME gallery, Perry Rubenstein Gallery, James Harris GalleryEdward Cella Art & Architecture, and Roberts Projects (formerly Roberts and Tilton). He has been included in over 50 group exhibitions in significant venues including The California Biennial: 2006 at the Orange County Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, Andreas Grimm Gallery in Munich, Germany, Harris Lieberman Gallery in New York, Flag Art Foundation in New York, Western Bridge in Seattle, Shane Campbell Gallery in Chicago, the California Museum of PhotographyMuseum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, the San Jose Museum of Art, and the Nevada Museum of Art. Zaki’s work is part of numerous public and private collections across the country including the Whitney Museum of American ArtNew Museum of Contemporary ArtLos Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)UCLA Hammer Museum, the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle, Washington, the Orange County museum of Art, and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Zaki has three monographs, VLHV (2003), Eleven Minus One (2010) and California Concrete: A Landscape of Skateparks (2019). He has been included in a Phaidon Press anthology of contemporary photography called Vitamin Ph and contributed essays to LACMA’s groundbreaking text, Words Without Pictures. He has been included in both an Aperture anthology organized by Charlotte Cotton called Photography is Magic, which addresses a major technological shift in contemporary photographic practices, as well as the anthology entitled Both Sides of Sunset: Photographing Los Angeles.

 

May 20
Natalie Ball: “Power Objects”4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series  Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research The event is free and open to the public and live on...
May 20 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series 
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Natalie Ball was born and raised in Portland, Oregon. She has a Bachelor’s degree with a double major in Ethnic Studies and Art from the University of Oregon. She furthered her education in New Zealand at Massey University where she attained her Master’s degree, focusing on Indigenous contemporary art. Ball then relocated to her ancestral homelands to raise her three children. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally, including the Half Gallery, NY; Vancouver Art Gallery, BC; Blum & Poe, LA; Portland Art Museum, OR; Gagosian, NY; Seattle Art Museum, WA; Almine Rech Gallery, FR; and SculptureCenter, NY. Natalie attained her M.F.A. degree in Painting & Printmaking at Yale School of Art in 2018. She is the recipient of the 2020 Bonnie Bronson Award, 2020 Joan Mitchell Painters & Sculptors Grant, 2019 Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, and the 2018 Betty Bowen Award from the Seattle Art Museum.

 

May 27
Mario Ybarra Jr.: “I Did It for Revenge!” George and Matilda Fowler Lecture5:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series  Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research The event is free and open to the public and live on...
May 27 5:00 p.m.

Spring 2021 Visiting Artist Lecture Series 
Presented by the Department of Art and Center for Art Research

The event is free and open to the public and live on Zoom- register here. The lecture will also live stream on the Department of Art Facebook.

Mario Ybarra Jr. will discuss some of his past projects and discuss the important role of the individual and collaborative artist in relationship to creating and in finding ways to tell one's family's stories and other marginalized narratives that have guided his artistic practice. He will engage audiences in creative strategies/tools for thinking and making Art.

Mario Ybarra Jr., is a visual and performance artist, educator, and activist who combines street culture with fine art in order to produce what he calls “contemporary art that is filtered through a Mexican-American experience in Los Angeles.”  His work has been included in many group exhibitions, including Installations Inside/Out: Armory 20th Anniversary Exhibition, Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena, California; San Juan Poly/Graphic Triennial of the Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña, San Juan, Puerto Rico; Phantom Sightings: Art After the Chicano Movement, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, California; and Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York (2008). He is co-founder of an artist run organization located in the Harbor area of Los Angeles, called Slanguage Studio (2002-present). 

Made possible by the George and Matilda Fowler Endowment Fund.

 

 

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